Posts Tagged ‘Video Game Industry’

Repost of a blog by Jeffrey Frizzell, who is a validation architect in Intel’s Visual & Parallel Computing Group. Though it’s obviously Intel-centric, his broader point about games psychology and technology motivation is well made and worth repeating.

Play Time – Why Games Matter
by Jeffrey Frizzell

This is the first of posts I will be doing on PC gaming over the next several months. As you can see in my bio, I work in software quality on the graphics driver team for Intel’s processor graphics – and my focus will be primarily on gaming with Intel’s HD Graphics on the new Sandybridge processors.

There seems to be something wired into the human psyche that makes us want to play – and to play games in particular. Games deliver the satisfaction of solving a puzzle, the adrenaline rush of competition, or just a simple diversion in our day. They allow us to get wound up or unwind depending on the occasion. They give us opportunity for interacting socially. The original Olympics even put games ahead of political and military rivalry.

Games come in many different forms – riddles, puzzles, board games, card games, raffles, races, all manner of sports. My youngest son always wants me to play games with him – generally of the Mille Bornes, mancala, Battleship, MasterMind variety. All of my children play sports – soccer, baseball, volleyball. My wife likes logic puzzles. I am a mild sudoku addict myself. I also like to watch games on TV – this shows that games stir us at a deep enough level that we can enjoy them even if we are just spectators participating vicariously. If you haven’t found a type of game to suit you, you probably haven’t looked hard enough. (more…)

Video Game Industry Leads Entertainment Job Creation in Texas

Incentive Program Grows Video Game Industry and State Investment

JANUARY 3, 2011 – WASHINGTON, DC – The computer and video game industry created more full time jobs in the past two years than any other moving image entertainment sector, according to a new report from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. An Analysis of Texas Economic Development Initiatives highlights state investment from the film, television, commercial, and video game industries and how each benefited from the “Texas Moving Image Industry Incentive Program.”

“The Texas incentive program is a great example of how investing in the computer and video game industry attracts 21st century jobs and boosts a state’s economy,” said Michael D. Gallagher, president and CEO of the Entertainment Software Association, the trade association representing U.S. computer and video game publishers. “We commend Governor Perry and the Texas legislature for their vision in creating a program to cultivate these high-tech jobs.”

The comptroller’s report found that the state’s incentive program, first enacted in 2007 and expanded in 2009, contributed significantly to the computer and video game industry’s growth in Texas by creating an estimated 1,700 jobs between April 2009 and August 2010. The incentive program provides grants for qualifying productions including movies, television shows, commercials and computer and video games in an effort to create jobs for Texas residents.

“Texas was one of the first states with an incentive for the video game industry, and it has proven successful,” said Texas Comptroller Susan Combs. “In 2009, the video game industry spent $234 million in Texas and employed 3,400 permanent workers with a positive economic impact on the state and on their local communities.”

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As told to Forbes by Gregory Short and Geoffrey Zatkin, co-founders of EEDAR.

What is the hardest challenge your company has faced to date? Have you overcome it? If so, specifically how?

At EEDAR, our hardest challenge was tied directly to our greatest strength. As a result of our massive proprietary videogame database, EEDAR is able to provide the videogame industry with both a completely new way to evaluate the potential profitability of game titles and a set of highly advanced data analysis tools.

The challenge was teaching an entire industry about more accurate, efficient and comprehensive tools available for making critical business decisions than what was used for the past 20 years: experience and gut instinct-based decision making.

EEDAR continues to work on overcoming this enormous challenge of educating clients on the benefits of data-driven decision making through building strong client relationships, frequent training sessions, strategic use of the press and, most importantly, ensuring our products and services deliver the results our clients require.

Which company/entrepreneur do you model your business after and why?

As a start-up company, EEDAR closely followed many of the principles espoused by Guy Kawasaki in his book The Art of the Start. EEDAR was already on the right track to an extent, but three key lessons from Mr. Kawasaki’s work helped us focus our efforts more productively.

Firstly, EEDAR strove to be a company of meaning; We wanted EEDAR to be a company that would be a positive change for the entire videogame industry, not just another research firm.

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